Steps from Everything…

Aside

One of the many benefits of staying with us here at the Nassau Inn is our close proximity to first-class shopping, dining, entertainment, and history. Our guests truly appreciate being just steps away from everything. As evidence, here is a list of 10 popular attractions in downtown Princeton – along with the number of steps it takes to get to each one from here. So, tap on your activity tracker and let’s compare steps…  


1.) NASSAU HALL (425 steps)

Everywhere - nassau hallNassau Hall was built in 1756 to house what was then the College of New Jersey. It was the largest stone building in the American Colonies.

The name “Nassau Hall” was proposed by Governor Jonathan Belcher in honor of King William III, “who was a branch of the illustrious house of Nassau.”
Click here to learn more…


2.) PALMER HOUSE (633 steps)

Everywhere - Palmer HouseThe original owner was Commodore Robert Stockton (1795-1866), grandson of the signer of The Declaration of Independence. He married Maria Potter of Charleston, South Carolina and they received the house as a wedding present from her father, John.

When Robert moved across the street into “Morven,” the old Stockton homestead, he sold Palmer House to his brother-in-law, James Potter. (Later he built “Lowrie House” down Stockton Street for one of his children while his older brother-in-law, Thomas Potter, built “Prospect House” on the south side of the campus – both designed by John Nottman of Philadelphia.
Click here to learn more…


3.) PRINCETON BATTLE MONUMENT (633 steps)

Everywhere - Princeton Battle Monument

On January 3, 1777, the peaceful winter fields and woods of Princeton Battlefield were transformed into the site of what is considered to be the fiercest fight of its size during the American Revolution. During this desperate battle, American troops under General George Washington surprised and defeated a force of British Regulars. Coming at the end of “The Ten Crucial Days” which saw the well-known night crossing of the Delaware River and two battles in Trenton, the Battle of Princeton gave Washington his first victory against the British Regulars on the field. The battle extended over a mile away to the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). Click here to learn more…


4.) PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM (670 steps)

Everywhere - Art MuseumThe origins of Princeton’s art collections date nearly to the University’s foundation, thus making Princeton one of the oldest collecting institutions in America. The Museum and what is now the Department of Art and Archaeology—the second oldest in the nation—formally came into being in 1882, founded on a philosophy that positioned Princeton at the cutting edge of scholarship in an era when the history of art was a new academic discipline, largely confined to the more advanced universities of Europe. Click here to learn more…


5.) BAINBRIDGE HOUSE (686 steps)

Everwhere - Bainbridge HouseBainbridge House is one of the oldest surviving buildings in Princeton and one of the area’s best preserved examples of mid-Georgian architecture. Located on Nassau Street, the town’s busiest and most historic thoroughfare, it is situated directly across from Princeton University. Bainbridge House has been home to several Stockton families; it was the birthplace of William Bainbridge, hero of the War of 1812; in 1783 it was listed as providing accommodations for the Continental Congress; during the late 19th century it served as a boarding house for university students; and for more than fifty years it was home to the public library. Click here to learn more…


6.) MORVEN MUSEUM (844 steps)

Everywhere - MorvenHome to one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and to five New Jersey governors, Morven has played a role in the history of New Jersey and the nation for more than 250 years.

After the Governor’s Mansion was relocated in 1982, Morven went through an extensive restoration and archaeological investigation. Morven re-opened as a museum and garden in 2004.
Click here to learn more…


 7.) PRINCETON CEMETERY (844 steps)

Everywhere - CemeteryThe Princeton Cemetery is a unique burial ground.  It is the final resting place for a President and a Vice President of the United States, most of the Presidents of the College of New Jersey/Princeton University and the Princeton Theological Seminary.  Scattered throughout the cemetery are the graves of soldiers beginning with the Revolutionary War, professors, politicians, musicians, scientists, business executives, writers, a Nobel Laureate, a winner of Pulitzer Prizes as well as those who have called the Princeton area home.  Take your time and enjoy the rich history of America captured here, and a small town’s place in that history. Click here to learn more…


8.) McCARTER THEATER (1056 steps)

Everywhere - McCarter TheaterMcCarter Theatre Center for the Performing Arts – the region’s leading performing arts center – has a rich history of artists who have graced its stage for over 80 years. Built as a permanent home for the Princeton University Triangle Club (who continue to perform at McCarter to this day) with funds from Thomas N. McCarter, class of 1888, the theater opened its doors on February 21, 1930 with a special performance of the 40th annual Triangle show, The Golden Dog. One of its stars was Joshua Logan, a junior and a sophomore named James Stewart was in the chorus. Click here to learn more…


9.) ALBERT EINSTEIN HOUSE (1267 steps)

Everywhere -The Albert Einstein House at 112 Mercer Street in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States was the home of Albert Einstein from 1936 until his death in 1955.

The house “was probably built in the 1870s or 1880s. The house is a simple pattern-book cottage and in itself is of no particular architectural significance”.

Albert Einstein reportedly requested that this house not be made a museum, and the family did not want it to be recognized as such. Nonetheless it was added to the National Register of Historic Places and further designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1976. Click here to learn more…


 10.) CLEVELAND TOWER (1900 steps)

Everywhere - Cleveland TowerIts beauty often compared to that of Oxford University’s Magdalen Tower, the 173-foot Cleveland Tower flanks the main entrance to Princeton’s Graduate College. One of the principal structures of the Graduate College when it was dedicated in 1913, the tower was erected as a memorial to President Grover Cleveland, who, following his retirement from public life, was a trustee of Princeton University and chaired the trustees’ graduate school committee. Funds for the construction of the tower were raised by public subscription from “citizens of all parties in all walks of life from all parts of the United States.”  Click here to learn more…


 

 

 

 

A Closer Look at the Princeton Alumni Wall of Fame: Samuel A. Alito, Jr.

Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr.
Class of 1972
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Born: April 1, 1950     Hometown: Hamilton, NJ
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Alito is best known for being the 110th Supreme Court Justice of the United States. Alito was nominated by George W. Bush in 2005 and sworn into office on January 31st, 2006.


EDUCATION
Alito attended Steinert High School in Hamilton Township, where he excelled academically. He was active in more than 10 clubs, including the debate team, band, track, and the honor society. He also served as president of the student council and graduated as class valedictorian.

After high school, Alito attended Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

While at Princeton he captained the Princeton Debate Panel and joined the ROTC.

Alito set his course for the Supreme Court early on as indicated in the 1972 Nassau Hall Yearbook, which read, “Sam intends to go to law school and eventually warm a seat on the Supreme Court”.


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UPBRINGING
Alito’s parents grew up in poor families where little English was spoken, but they both went to college and became teachers. They believed anything was possible with hard work, and they particularly stressed the importance of education.

A colleague described Alito’s upbringing as “Go do your homework now and, after you do it, go find some other way to improve yourself.”

 


CAREER
Alito’s commitment to achieving goals is reflected in his impressive resume. Alito began
his career working as an assistant U.S. attorney in the district of New Jersey before transferring to the solicitor general’s office. He then spent time working at the Office of Legal Counsel before returning to New Jersey as the U.S. Attorney for the district of New Jersey.

As a Supreme Court Justice, it has been said that his jurisprudence has been methodical, cautious, respectful of precedent and solidly conservative.

alito 3 - Copy

The Selfie Appeal of the Nassau Inn

With a dynamic history, brilliant architecture, and an extensive catalog of distinguished guests, the Nassau Inn has developed a solid reputation for its Selfie Appeal. If you’re visiting downtown Princeton, here are FIVE incredible selfie opportunities on the Nassau Inn property that you won’t want to miss.

THE ICONIC RED DOOR
The inviting bright red door of the Nassau Inn is as illustrious as the many historic figures that once walked through it. Between its curious colonial flair and enduring history, the Red Door has become both a popular tourist attraction and a backdrop for countless celebratory life events. Local legend has it that couples who wed before the red door will be endowed with a long, happy, and healthy marriage.

selfie station - iconic red door

THE LOBBY FIREPLACE
The warming flames of the upper lobby fireplace and comfy red leather chairs have long brought repose to enervated travelers. Some of the world’s finest leaders and innovators, past and present, have relaxed before the calm blaze discussing local, national, and world affairs. If you listen close enough on a quiet day, you can hear the whisper of conversations past within the soothing snap and crackle of the dancing flames.

selfie station - L2

PRINCETON ALUMNI WALL OF FAME
If you’re entering the Yankee Doodle Tap Room from the Nassau Inn’s main lobby, it’s likely your attention will be briefly redirected from joyful thoughts of food and drink, to the allure of the Princeton Alumni Wall of Fame. The tributary wall showcases many young faces of Princeton graduates that went on to become prominent public figures of the past and present.

Selfie Station - Wall of FameDR. EINSTEIN’S SIGNATURE CARVED INTO TABLE
Since as far back as the day the Yankee Doodle Tap Room first opened its doors, Princetonians have long enjoyed the practice of carving their names and initials into the restaurant’s thick oak tabletops. Among these Princetonians, the world’s most famous scientist, Albert Einstein, also etched his signature distinctly into one of the many hardwood slabs. If you look close enough, perhaps you can find it. If not, just ask one of our helpful staff to point it out. 

selfie station - Einstein

ROCKWELL PAINTING
Illuminating brilliantly behind the bar of the Yankee Doodle Tap Room hangs the centerpiece and namesake of the historic restaurant: Norman Rockwell’s Yankee Doodle Dandy. In 1936, the Nassau Inn commissioned Rockwell to paint what would be his only mural, a 13 foot long detailed historical vignette of Yankee Doodle. Rockwell completed the work in 1937, and it was prominently put on display at the Yankee Doodle Tap Room ever since.

selfie station - Rockwell

 

Let’s Make History

blog joeBy Joe Bergin

Picture this: You have just finished chatting with a friend you haven’t been able to spend time with for a little while.  It is brought up in the conversation that you’d like to plan a day or night to go out, kick back, and try to catch up.  There was even some talk about inviting a few more of your friends to tag along.  It sounded great, and you were excited for it. You were really just tangled up in the moment.

Until the conversation ended, and the phones were put down, you hadn’t really thought about HOW you were going to actually spend the night.  In a way, you seem to expect the perfect plans to just fall into your lap. Continue reading

Hotel Safety Tips while traveling

BLOG HOTEL PHOTOBy Michael Bonotto, Security & Safety Director

Security and safety while traveling, both in the United States and abroad, sometimes is not on your packing list but once there becomes apparent. Being prepared on a trip can help alleviate stress, anxiety and help the journey to be more enjoyable.

Before you even leave for your vacation, check the Internet, is the hotel in a safe neighborhood, how is the parking, where is the parking. What’s the area like during the day and at night? If traveling to another country who is picking you up or how are you getting to the hotel. These considerations should be thought of weeks in advance of your trip.  Any credit cards, tickets, passports and other important documents should be copied and left at home in case they are lost. Valuables like jewelry should also be photographed and insured by your home owner’s policy. Make a packing list with check boxes, this list will help you formulate a plan and help you get organized. Continue reading

Ghost of the Inn…

For years I’d heard testimony of ghost sightings at the Nassau Inn, however I had spent countless hours walking the hallowed corridors and never experienced even the slightest offbeat encounter.

At times I wondered about the possibility, if for no other reason than the consistency of guest’s stories. Many took place in the same location and their experiences were similar in nature. Ultimately I listened to the stories and although I was agreeable, I was not a believer.

That was until about two years ago… Continue reading

Springing into Spring

By: Jackie Brigante

In like a lion and out like a lamb – that’s what they say! The spring equinox is always (in my humble opinion) the quintessential end to dreary winter months. Day light saving time rolls in full-force behind that pesky Punxsutawney Phil bringing with it sunny mornings and delayed sunsets.

One of my favorite things about working in Princeton was the all-around buzz that arrived with the spring. Part of my morning ritual was always pausing to look at the tulips as they broke their way through the ground and sprung to life. Potted plants popped up outside of shops and downtown was full of kids eating Bent Spoon ice cream and playing outside. Continue reading

To Brine or Not To Brine?

By: Keir DeFonzo

We all have our uncompromising ways of just how to prepare a Turkey for the big Thanksgiving feast. Some pride themselves on generations of family secrets to get their birds just to the right desire of crispy on the outside and juicy on the inside. There are lots of different ways to handle the main attraction on our dinner table. But one question to ask as we kickoff the holiday season is whether or not to brine your turkey.

Brine is a salt solution in which the turkey is submerged and kept chilled, in the refrigerator or a cooler, overnight, before being cooked. Some may argue brining a turkey is the only way to guarantee the juiciest meat. This especially occurs in the turkey breast which is notorious for being dry if over-cooked. Others feel that the brine will compromise the flavor since the ones we buy from the store already are high in sodium and have been pre-treated with brine before being sold.

With salt as the main ingredient, the solution will allow the salt to transfer into the meat overnight and act as a sponge to retain the juices and moisture. The bird will lose some of its water when cooking off in the heat; brine will prevent the bird from losing too much. The fun part of preparing the brine is that you can add herbs and aromatics to give the flavor a twist that will enhance the meal. For example, some people add bay leaves, rosemary or peppercorns. The options are endless. Having experience with the brine myself, I will say that once I started the tradition, I find there is no other way to go. Where I keep perfecting my technique is in the ingredients of the brine. One thing is for sure; my days of serving turkey that needs to be drowned in gravy are over! Turkey can now stand alone on the plate and compete with its rivals (the potato, the stuffing and the cranberry) for your taste buds attention.
One last tip I will share that I picked up along my cooking travels: place the bird breast down. The majority of the fat is actually in the back. By cooking your turkey face down, the fat will naturally create an additional baste for the white meat and create perfection!

Executive Chef Nino LaCasio’s Turkey Brine Recipe For an 8lb Turkey:
2-1/2 gallons cold water
2 cups kosher salt
11/2 cup sugar
2 bay leaves, torn into pieces
4 tablespoons dried thyme
1 whole head of garlic, peeled
1 cup of pickling spice
2 tbsp Ground pepper

Whisk sugar and salt in water till it dissolves. Stir in other ingredients. Pour over turkey in a plastic bag and tightly seal the bag before refrigerating. Make sure turkey is fully submerged in the solution and let soak overnight. Drain Turkey and pat dry. Allow to sit one hour before roasting.