Steps from Everything…


One of the many benefits of staying with us here at the Nassau Inn is our close proximity to first-class shopping, dining, entertainment, and history. Our guests truly appreciate being just steps away from everything. As evidence, here is a list of 10 popular attractions in downtown Princeton – along with the number of steps it takes to get to each one from here. So, tap on your activity tracker and let’s compare steps…  

1.) NASSAU HALL (425 steps)

Everywhere - nassau hallNassau Hall was built in 1756 to house what was then the College of New Jersey. It was the largest stone building in the American Colonies.

The name “Nassau Hall” was proposed by Governor Jonathan Belcher in honor of King William III, “who was a branch of the illustrious house of Nassau.”
Click here to learn more…

2.) PALMER HOUSE (633 steps)

Everywhere - Palmer HouseThe original owner was Commodore Robert Stockton (1795-1866), grandson of the signer of The Declaration of Independence. He married Maria Potter of Charleston, South Carolina and they received the house as a wedding present from her father, John.

When Robert moved across the street into “Morven,” the old Stockton homestead, he sold Palmer House to his brother-in-law, James Potter. (Later he built “Lowrie House” down Stockton Street for one of his children while his older brother-in-law, Thomas Potter, built “Prospect House” on the south side of the campus – both designed by John Nottman of Philadelphia.
Click here to learn more…


Everywhere - Princeton Battle Monument

On January 3, 1777, the peaceful winter fields and woods of Princeton Battlefield were transformed into the site of what is considered to be the fiercest fight of its size during the American Revolution. During this desperate battle, American troops under General George Washington surprised and defeated a force of British Regulars. Coming at the end of “The Ten Crucial Days” which saw the well-known night crossing of the Delaware River and two battles in Trenton, the Battle of Princeton gave Washington his first victory against the British Regulars on the field. The battle extended over a mile away to the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). Click here to learn more…


Everywhere - Art MuseumThe origins of Princeton’s art collections date nearly to the University’s foundation, thus making Princeton one of the oldest collecting institutions in America. The Museum and what is now the Department of Art and Archaeology—the second oldest in the nation—formally came into being in 1882, founded on a philosophy that positioned Princeton at the cutting edge of scholarship in an era when the history of art was a new academic discipline, largely confined to the more advanced universities of Europe. Click here to learn more…

5.) BAINBRIDGE HOUSE (686 steps)

Everwhere - Bainbridge HouseBainbridge House is one of the oldest surviving buildings in Princeton and one of the area’s best preserved examples of mid-Georgian architecture. Located on Nassau Street, the town’s busiest and most historic thoroughfare, it is situated directly across from Princeton University. Bainbridge House has been home to several Stockton families; it was the birthplace of William Bainbridge, hero of the War of 1812; in 1783 it was listed as providing accommodations for the Continental Congress; during the late 19th century it served as a boarding house for university students; and for more than fifty years it was home to the public library. Click here to learn more…

6.) MORVEN MUSEUM (844 steps)

Everywhere - MorvenHome to one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence and to five New Jersey governors, Morven has played a role in the history of New Jersey and the nation for more than 250 years.

After the Governor’s Mansion was relocated in 1982, Morven went through an extensive restoration and archaeological investigation. Morven re-opened as a museum and garden in 2004.
Click here to learn more…

 7.) PRINCETON CEMETERY (844 steps)

Everywhere - CemeteryThe Princeton Cemetery is a unique burial ground.  It is the final resting place for a President and a Vice President of the United States, most of the Presidents of the College of New Jersey/Princeton University and the Princeton Theological Seminary.  Scattered throughout the cemetery are the graves of soldiers beginning with the Revolutionary War, professors, politicians, musicians, scientists, business executives, writers, a Nobel Laureate, a winner of Pulitzer Prizes as well as those who have called the Princeton area home.  Take your time and enjoy the rich history of America captured here, and a small town’s place in that history. Click here to learn more…

8.) McCARTER THEATER (1056 steps)

Everywhere - McCarter TheaterMcCarter Theatre Center for the Performing Arts – the region’s leading performing arts center – has a rich history of artists who have graced its stage for over 80 years. Built as a permanent home for the Princeton University Triangle Club (who continue to perform at McCarter to this day) with funds from Thomas N. McCarter, class of 1888, the theater opened its doors on February 21, 1930 with a special performance of the 40th annual Triangle show, The Golden Dog. One of its stars was Joshua Logan, a junior and a sophomore named James Stewart was in the chorus. Click here to learn more…

9.) ALBERT EINSTEIN HOUSE (1267 steps)

Everywhere -The Albert Einstein House at 112 Mercer Street in Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey was the home of Albert Einstein from 1936 until his death in 1955.

The house is a simple pattern-book cottage and in itself is of no particular architectural significance”.

Albert Einstein reportedly requested that this house not be made a museum, and the family did not want it to be recognized as such. Nonetheless it was added to the National Register of Historic Places and further designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1976. Click here to learn more…

 10.) CLEVELAND TOWER (1900 steps)

Everywhere - Cleveland TowerIts beauty often compared to that of Oxford University’s Magdalen Tower, the 173-foot Cleveland Tower flanks the main entrance to Princeton’s Graduate College. One of the principal structures of the Graduate College when it was dedicated in 1913, the tower was erected as a memorial to President Grover Cleveland, who, following his retirement from public life, was a trustee of Princeton University and chaired the trustees’ graduate school committee. Funds for the construction of the tower were raised by public subscription from “citizens of all parties in all walks of life from all parts of the United States.”  Click here to learn more…






In recent months, the Nassau Inn has embarked on a “rejuvenation.” This included a new outdoor patio and upgrades to several blocks of rooms.  While this project is currently underway and will continue throughout April 2011, we wanted to share with you a few of the changes and updates that can be expected!

Our guestrooms will be enhanced with new furniture, flat screen TVs, plush bed linens and remodeled bathrooms.  Additionally, all of our guest elevators are receiving new mechanicals and cab interiors.  

In 2012, the guest rooms  in the Colonial Wing of the Inn will be complete, as will the replacement of the public space carpeting on levels 1 and 2. The Ballroom, Senior Room and Assembly room will be fully renovated with new window treatments, wall coverings, audio and visual upgrades and much more!

We are very excited about the rejuvenation project here at the Nassau Inn and are pleased to share with you updates and progress. As we renovate rooms and meeting space throughout the hotel, I can assure you that the 18th century elegance and charm of the Nassau Inn will not be lost.

As always, we welcome your feedback and hope you will stop in and take a look at the renovation in progress!

Welcome Back Princeton University Students

This post was co-written with Lucia Scotto.

Autumn is the season that the Nassau Inn staff looks forward to the most.  The trees along Palmer Square and Nassau Street begin to burst with vibrant colors and the streets awaken, filled with the hustle and bustle of Princeton University students, parents, and professors.  The Nassau Inn has the great fortune of bearing witness as a host for all, from near or far.

View of Nassau Inn From Palmer Square

Nothing can replicate the energy that derives from this annual migration into Princeton.  Every spring we say goodbye to one and in the fall hello to another, always keeping the town’s spirit renewed and the memories of yesterday’s guests close.

The Yankee Doodle Tap Room becomes the hub of sociability, bringing together students, locals, and hotel guests providing the perfect venue for the forging of lifetime friendships and bonds.

The lobby of our Inn is always buzzing as it serves as the gateway to everything Princeton and the Nassau Inn has to offer. Whether it’s a bride and groom organizing their last minute wedding details, guests checking in, or friends planning their next excursion, we will certainly greet you with a warm smile as you re-energize this town (and our staff). We are thrilled and honored you have chosen to be a part of the rich history of the Nassau Inn.

So whether you’re here to say hello, goodbye, or meet up with friends, the Historic Nassau Inn would like to say, “Welcome back and see you again soon.”


Renovated Room

Yesterday we entered into phase two of our guest room rejuvenation. Guests can look forward to new furnishings, bedding, 42″ flat screen TV’s and a completely renovated guest bathroom.

This phase should be complete by September 1, 2010. Phase three will begin mid-December and at its conclusion at the end of March, 2011 we will have completed half of the inventory of guest rooms in the Inn.