A Seasonal Guide for Princeton Travel

Princeton welcomes you any time of the year. When coming to visit us here in Princeton, know what to expect depending on the season!

Traveling

If you’re coming during the autumn, expect green, auburn, and yellow crisp leaves scattered across the grass and sidewalks. Pack layers of clothing so you can enjoy the scenery outside without being bothered by the cool gushes of wind. During this season, try the Pumpkin Spiced Café at the Yankee Doodle Tap Room for freshly brewed coffee with pumpkin spice, cinnamon and whipped cream.

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When winter is here, make sure to keep warm under a big coat. Occasionally, the snow may drizzle. It’s the perfect weather to wear knit hats, mittens and hold hands while staring into the effervescent lights spread jubilantly around Princeton. Join in on the holiday cheer at Palmer Square, where you are sure to bump into carolers or even the big man himself!

Winter Wonderland - outsideSpring is cherry blossom season. Many trees are in bloom here. You don’t want to miss out on the flower filled tree lined streets. Take a walk around the University, Cherry Valley Road, and Washington Ave. This is a good time to bring out the capris, cardigans, blazers, and light jackets for the evenings. Cherry-Blossoms1

Image source

“And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

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The moment summer arrives is when Princeton feels particularly like an F. Scott Fitzgerald novel. In his novel, This Side of Paradise, his writing exemplifies the beauty of Princeton and the special place he had for it in his heart, not failing to mention the Nassau Inn! Summer is time to begin again—so strip away from all the layers, and pack light clothing.

Happy travels!


About the Author: Lily Lee is the Marketing Assistant at the historical Nassau Inn. She graduated from Rutgers University with a B.A. in Communications, minor in Digital Information & Media, and a passion for English and creative writing.

5 Wonderful Ways to Celebrate Mother’s Day in Princeton

On the day where we go out of our way to show our moms exactly how much they mean to us, Princeton provides plenty of options. Whether Mom wants a show, a stroll or a shopping trip, there’s something for everyone in our roundup below.

Kick off the day with a fragrant bouquet of freshly cut, elegantly arranged flowers. Our friends at Viburnum Designs can help you find the perfect combination.

mothersdayflowers

Mother’s Day brunch at the Yankee Doodle Tap Room has been a beloved tradition in Princeton for generations. Enjoy an unforgettable dining experience that mom will love. See the full menu here.

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Drop by Palmer Square where mom can take her pick from familiar brand names such as Ann Taylor and Ralph Lauren, or the many unique locally-owned boutiques, spas, and galleries.

Palmer Square

Take a leisurely stroll around downtown Princeton and through the stunning Princeton University campus. While there, visit the Princeton University Art Museum and Prospect Gardens for even more fun.

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Take in a show at the world renowned McCarter Theater. See what’s scheduled for Mother’s Day here.

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Fun Thanksgiving Facts

When most people think of a Princeton Thanksgiving, the first thing that comes to mind is spending joyous time with family and feasting on culinary delights such as as golden-roasted turkey, fluffy stuffing, tangy cranberry sauce, and whipped cream on top of pumpkin pie at the historic Yankee Doodle Tap Room.

Wherever you spend your Thanksgiving, here are 10 fun Thanksgiving Day facts to think about and share with your family and friends as you dig into this year’s turkey:

Since 1947, the president has pardoned a live turkey every Thanksgiving and allows it to live out its days on a historical farm.

The first Thanksgiving was a moment for the Pilgrims to thank God for allowing them to kill enough game and grow sufficient crops to get through the winter.

Wild turkeys can fly in short bursts at speeds up to 55 MPH.

Now a Thanksgiving dinner staple, cranberries actually were used by Native Americans to treat wounds and dye clothing. They did not eat them.

cranberries

The Thanksgiving Day football tradition began with Yale and Princeton, who played their first game in 1876 and drew yearly crowds of 40,000 to see them duke it out.

Princeton vs yale

The tradition of breaking a wishbone for good luck started with the Romans.

wishbone

So consumed with passion for the turkey and its respectful stature, it is said that Benjamin Franklin proposed the turkey become the United States national bird. However, the bald eagle, which Franklin thought had a “bad moral character” won out.

national turkey

St. Patrick’s Day might get the press, but the day before Thanksgiving is the biggest day for bar and liquor sales in the U.S., also ahead of the Super Bowl or New Years’ Eve.

liquor sales

The first national Thanksgiving was declared by President George Washington in 1789 – although it didn’t stick until Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation in 1863.

George Washington

Considered the “Mother of Thanksgiving,” Sara Hale (1788-1879) was an influential editor and writer who urged President Lincoln to proclaim a national day of thanksgiving. She selected the last Thursday in November because, as she said, harvests were done, elections were over, and summer travelers were home.

sarah hale

True History of the IPA

You can love them, you can hate them, you can pour them, you can make them, but there ipa 1
is no denying the fact that Indian pale ales have become America’s most popular beer style. In 1978, Congress passed a law that legalized home brewing in the United States. This law brought American brewing into a renaissance, allowing Indian pale ales into the hearts and mouths of main stream America.

ipa 2The origins of the style dates back to the 1700s. Back then, English colonies in India were heavily influenced by the East Indian Company. The imports they collected from trade were the colonists main supply line. A small brewery named Bow Brewery, on the most western edge of London, was credited with the widespread awareness of the style. Due more to the convenience rather than the craftsmanship, the EIC began trading with the small brewery. The style became popular with the colonists of India because of its lighter consistency and higher alcohol content. The Englishmen were used to drinking porters and the Pale Ale was a refreshing replacement. With approval of the Eastern Indian Colonists, the EIC was able to bring this style of beer across the Indian subcontinent, eventually coining the term “Indian Pale Ale”.

Indian Pale Ales require pale malts and a strong hop influence. This style is typically ipa 3higher in alcohol content (6-7% ABV) as appose to the tradition ales (4-5% ABV). With a variety of different hops in America there is no wonder American IPA became its own style. American IPA is considerably a whole different evolution from the English IPA. American IPA is generally drier and higher in alcohol where English IPA is malty. American hops causes the beer to be bitter and can give a collection of different flavors such as floral, citrus, and earthy characteristics. English hops are often fruity and give an herbal taste.

ipa 4The obsession with hops in our IPAs have given rise to an arms race in the field of IPAs. The development of the Imperial IPA or the Double IPA was a direct result. They typically have an alcohol content of 7.5% or higher. Claims have been made that the recipe originated in Santa Rosa, CA, in 1994 at the Russian River Brewing Company. The style is beloved by craft beer drinkers in San Diego with such a passion that some refer to the Double IPA as, “San Diego Pale Ale”. The beer is extremely hoppy in flavor, but that is not even the hoppiest, my friends. Somewhere in America there must be some non-descript building inhabiting an evil genius and their laboratory whose sole purposes is to develop the hoppiest beer known to man. The Triple IPA has been on the shelves of liquor stores for quite some time, but only the strong of heart dare to drink them. With the classification as nothing lower than 10% ABV, Triple IPAs are the most full flavored and bitterest of the IPAs known to date. But don’t worry, the same evil geniuses have developed a beer that is far less complex. The newest development to the Indian Pale Ales is not an ale at all, it is actually a Lager. The Indian Pale Lager (IPL) tends to be hopped as an IPA but values bottom-fermenting yeast which gives a lager its signature. An easier drink, the IPL has a lighter, cleaner body and the hops are more subtle.

From England to India then to its rightful home, America. IPAs have developed and evolved through history and will continue as long as there are creative brewers and ipa 5enthusiastic drinkers. So next time your at the bar with your buddies and someone asks, “Where do IPAs come from?” You can shut down the know it all who says, “It’s an Indian Beer”. Be sure to tell them the true story, where IPAs are from and where they are going. Until text time Keep Laughing ,Keep Drinking, and Keep Living!!!!!!